Self-Image

This theme is very personal and focuses on the way you look at yourself as a human being. Working on this topic can be done in a group, but even more so individually. Since it can be very personal and private, sharing experiences is not always a must in this topic.

Age 8 to 12

Life skill(s): Recognizing and accepting emotions

Age group: 8-12

Number of participants: Maximum of 15 people per group

Location: Room with tables and chairs

Time: 60 minutes

Material:

  • Paper (A4)
  • Pens
  • Markers
  • Pencils
  • Tables
  • Chairs
  • Possibly:
    • Glue
    • Magazines
    • Coloured paper
    • Scissors
    • Stickers

Description:

Emotion bus

Set up some chairs in rows to form a bus, the amount of chairs is dependant on the number of participants. Set up a chair in the front of the bus as well, for the bus driver. Pick a participant from the group to be the bus driver, this person is gonna sit on its chair before the game starts. The rest of the group forms a row on the side of the bus. One by one someone will step into the bus, showing an emotion. Everybody who is already in the bus, mimics this emotion, including the bus driver. They keep on showing this emotion until a new passenger steps into the bus, with a new emotion. Try to participate as well by joining the group. The basic emotions can always be used, but try to stimulate the group to find other emotions as well. The six basic emotions are: anger, sadness, happiness, fear, disgust and surprise.

Emotiecirkel

Discuss the 6 basic emotions by using the emotion circle. Start with the inner circle. Ask the children to show the emotion; what would you do if you had this emotion? How would you act? What would be your facial expression? When there is time left and the participants give you the feeling they would like to go more in depth, use the outer 2 circles as well.

Dilemma game

Ask questions about concerning emotions and how you show these. You can think of questions yourself, but you can also use the examples listed here below:

  • Is it normal to cry when you are happy? Why or why not?
  • When you are surprised, do you scream? Why or why not?
  • When someone is scared, he or she will cry. True or not? And why?
  • How would you react when you get a bad grade? Would you be angry or sad? And why?
  • How do you react when you receive a gift? And why?
  • Are you scared sometimes?
  • Can you easily express your emotions?
  • Do you sometimes cry?
  • Are you happy today?

Try to ask question about the answer of the group, to create a deeper conversation.

Papier opdracht

Hand out an A4 paper to every participant and let them fold it so you get 6 equal squares. In the corners of every square they write one of the 6 basic emotions, make sure everyone use the same order. Instruct the participants to draw, write or craft something in each square that represents that specific emotion for them. Is the material is there, they can also use pictures from the magazine or stickers. Make sure everyone is working on the same emotion at the same time, but stimulate individual work so that they really have to think for themselves. Give them a couple of minutes for every emotion and once they are finished, ask a few participants to show and explain what they made.

Ending

Clean up the room together and briefly discuss the activity. Give the group a small talk/piece of advice that they should always decide for themselves if, how and when they show their emotions and that emotions are nothing to be ashamed of. Keep in mind that the view on emotions might differ from your own culture, so try to stay neutral and don’t reject their culture.

Age 12 to 16

Life skill(s): Self Awareness

Age group: 10+

Number of participants: 5-15 people

Location: Room where there is enough space to play a ballgame but also sit down to write

Time: 45-60 minutes

Material:

  • Quality cards
  • Paper in 4 different colours
  • Ball
  • Post-its
  • Pens
  • Questions

Description:

Discovering your own qualities by doing active assignments.

Quality cards (+/- 15 min.)

Start the activity by discussing the quality cards. Everybody receives some post-it’s and a pen. They take a look at the cards and write down the qualities they think suit them best. Stimulate them to also think of some qualities that are not on the cards. Join this activity yourself as well and write down your qualities.

When everyone has written down a few qualities, make a big circle and grab a ball. The ball is being thrown around the circle and when you catch the ball, you name one of your qualities and toss the ball to the next person. Make sure everyone has had the ball at least once. Afterwards you can give the group some extra time to add qualities they have heard from others and think suit them as well.

Quality test

Next you are continuing with a small test, based on the four learning styles of Kolb. This is about your consciousness and why you do what you do. In every corner of the room is a coloured paper. Ask the question, let the participants choose a colour/corner, ask them to remember how many times they have chosen each colour and give them the results afterwards. This result will give an image of the qualities of the group.

The test:

  1. Someone asks you to organize an activity. How do you respond?
    1. Green: Can I work together with friends?
    2. Orange: Is it a competition? Is there something I can win?
    3. Red: When can I start?
    4. Purple: What kind of activity shall I organize?
  2. Together with friends you organize an activity. How do you choose what activity it is going to be?
    1. Green: I ask my friends what they would like to do
    2. Orange: I know what I want to do
    3. Red: I ask about experiences of others and what they liked about it. Afterwards I make my decision
    4. Purple: I search for a new idea
  3. Being part of a group, what is important for you?
    1. Green: That everyone can participate
    2. Orange: Having fun
    3. Red: Being punctual and following agreements
    4. Purple: Doing new, nice things and getting inspired
  4. If one of your friends is in trouble, how would you help him/her?
    1. Green: Show them compassion
    2. Orange: I solve the problem for him/her
    3. Red: I help however and whenever I can
    4. Purple: You want to know exactly what the problem is
  5. During an exposition at school, what is your role?
    1. Green: I welcome the guests
    2. Orange: I give a speech
    3. Red: I coordinate the entire day
    4. Purple: I prepare the program of the day in the preparation meetings.

Results:

  1. Mostly Green: Your main quality is empathy. You make sure the ambiance in the group is good.
  2. Mostly Orange: Your main quality is daring to do new things. People follow you.
  3. Mostly red: Your main quality is organizing. You make sure everything is arranged well.
  4. Mostly purple: Your main quality is having original ideas. You always come up with new and good ideas.

Ending

Briefly discuss the activity and ask if the children enjoyed it and if they have learned something. This will give you input for the next activity as well. Finish the activity with something inspiring, this can be a short talk, a motivating quote or a moral. For example: ‘Whatever we give our attention to, grows’.

Age 16 to 24

Life skill(s): Recognizing and accepting emotions

Age group: 16-24

Number of participants: Maximum of 30 people per group

Location: Room with tables and chairs

Time: 60 minutes

Material:

  • Paper (A4)
  • Pens
  • Markers
  • Pencils
  • Tables
  • Chairs
  • Possibly:
    • Glue
    • Magazines
    • Coloured paper
    • Scissors
    • Stickers

Description:

Emotion bus

Set up some chairs in rows to form a bus, the amount of chairs is dependant on the number of participants. Set up a chair in the front of the bus as well, for the bus driver. Pick a participant from the group to be the bus driver, this person is gonna sit on its chair before the game starts. The rest of the group forms a row on the side of the bus. One by one someone will step into the bus, showing an emotion. Everybody who is already in the bus, mimics this emotion, including the bus driver. They keep on showing this emotion until a new passenger steps into the bus, with a new emotion. Try to participate as well by joining the group. The basic emotions can always be used, but try to stimulate the group to find other emotions as well. The six basic emotions are: anger, sadness, happiness, fear, disgust and surprise.

Emotion circle

Discuss the different emotions by using the emotion circle. Start with the inner two circles and when there is time left and the participants give you the feeling they would like to go more in depth, use the outer circle as well.

Dilemma game

Ask questions about concerning emotions and how you show these. You can think of questions yourself, but you can also use the examples listed here below:

  • Is it normal to cry when you are happy? Why or why not?
  • When you are surprised, do you scream? Why or why not?
  • When someone is scared, he or she will cry. True or not? And why?
  • How would you react when you get a bad grade? Would you be angry or sad? And why?
  • How do you react when you receive a gift? And why?
  • Are you scared sometimes?
  • Can you easily express your emotions?
  • Do you sometimes cry?
  • Are you happy today?

Try to ask question about the answer of the group, to create a deeper conversation.

Moodboard

Hand out an A4 paper to the participants and let them make a moodboard about the (basic)emotions. They can give their own interpretation to every emotion, this can be in writing, drawing or by crafting and finding pictures in magazines. Try to let everyone work individually, so they really get to their own view on emotions. When they are done, ask some participants to explain what they made and what their idea behind it is.

Ending

Clean up the room together and briefly discuss the activity. Give the group a small talk/piece of advice that they should always decide for themselves if, how and when they show their emotions and that emotions are nothing to be ashamed of. Keep in mind that the view on emotions might differ from your own culture, so try to stay neutral and don’t reject their culture.

Ruim met elkaar op en hou nog een korte evaluatie. Geef de deelnemers mee dat ze zelf mogen kiezen hoe en wanneer ze hun emoties mogen uiten. Houdt er wel rekening mee dat er in deze cultuur waarschijnlijk heel anders met emoties wordt omgegaan, dus houdt je afsluiting neutraal en keur niks af.